Mobile News Mix

Why Market Researchers Shouldn't Stay Married - To Online Trackers

Posted by MFour on Nov 20, 2018 7:00:00 AM

Blog Marriage Stats Trackers 14Nov18

While market research continues to pop the questions it takes to gain consumer insights, young adults in the U.S. are becoming less and less likely to pop the question that sets couples on the path to marriage.

The U.S. Census Bureau reports that 29% of today’s 18- to 34-year-olds are married, compared to 59% in 1978. The median age at first marriage is now 29.8 years for men and 27.8 years for women, continuing a steady climb that began in1950 and has accelerated since the Great Recession.

Meanwhile, 3.85 million babies were born in the U.S. in 2017, a drop of 2% in just one year, and a decline of nearly 7% from the number of U.S. births in 2009.

Economics is clearly a factor. Among the 71% of adults under 35 who are not married, only 20% earn at least $40,000 a year. For married young adults, the proportion earning at least $40,000 doubles to 40%.

Marriage, parenthood and the formation of households are, of course, of fundamental importance not only to people’s personal lives, but to their lives as consumers. Perhaps the most important message that market research can take from these powerful demographic developments is that big changes are afoot, even for enduring facets of life that many of us consider unshakable. In the face of great changes, it’s crucial for consumer insights professionals to be constantly alert and rapidly adaptable when it comes to the best practices for understanding how the consumer landscape is shifting.

Given these realities, does it make sense to accept longstanding common wisdom about research and its methods? For example, should long term tracking studies put such a premium on methodological consistency that they sacrifice accuracy for the sake of keeping all their data ducks in a neat row?  The acceleration of change should tell you that those ducks are probably waddling around in patterns that have changed considerably since the tracking study was launched.

If you’re committed to continuity in your online trackers, and worried that you’ll lose data continuity if you switch to mobile, it’s time for more flexible thinking. Mobile living is the way consumers live today. Their phones are always with them. The personal computers you’ve relied on for answers to online tracking surveys are now optional for many consumers, and they’ve become especially less relevant outside of white-collar workplaces and home offices.

So if you’re still holding out against mobile tracking data, maybe it’s time to reconsider whether that approach is really stalwart and steady-on. In a changing world, integrating mobile data into tracking studies isn’t the risky play. It’s the conservative move – if data accuracy and true consumer representation are the values you’re trying to conserve. In a time of flux, the riskiest behavior is to ignore fundamental changes and stand still. For better or for worse, it’s just a fact that young adults are postponing marriage. It’s also just a fact that consumers have gone mobile. To stay on track, trackers must move with them.

For more on how to integrate mobile into your tracking studies, just click here.

 

 

 

Topics: market research, surveys, demographics, millennials

In-App Mobile Market Research Reached 2,500 Millennials for in-Depth Consumer Insights

Posted by MFour on Nov 14, 2018 11:00:00 AM

Blog Millennial Women 13Nov18

Accurate consumer insights on Millennials will continue to be essential for decades. MFour Client ROTH Capital Partners (ROTH) has taken the challenge seriously, undertaking an in-depth study of 2,500 Millennial men and women in partnership with MFour.

You can check out ROTH’s announcement of its 2018-2019 Millennial Study by clicking here.

The survey encompassed 181 questions and had an average Length of Interview of more than 28 minutes, confirming respondents’ willingness to engage with longer, in-depth surveys if they’re conducted in the mobile-app environment that has become the most natural habitat for today’s consumers.

Among the study’s findings:

  • Two thirds of Millennials prefer to research significant purchases online, but 57% still prefer to carry out transactions in-store.
  • Virtual Reality shopping has become a fact, with 15% of Millennials saying they have used VR to evaluate furniture, while 16% have used “virtual mirrors” to see how they’ll actually look in cosmetics or clothes they’re considering.
  • Nike’s marketing gamble on Colin Kaepernick has paid off with Millennials – 34% said they’re more likely to purchase Nike products following the ad campaign featuring the controversial NFL quarterback, compared to 15% who said the ads made them less likely to purchase Nike goods.

Mobile studies such as the one by ROTH dispel two main myths of market research:

  • That Millennials are a generation that’s especially “hard to reach." 
  • And that mobile surveys are only effective for quick-hit surveys with short, simple questionnaires.

Increasingly, consumer insights professionals are realizing that Millennials are well in reach and can be understood in-depth if you reach out to them in the mobile-app space where they’re most comfortable.

Topics: consumer insights, mobile market research, in-app Mobile surveys, millennials, in-depth surveys, mobile myths

Census Trends Spell Bad News for Online Market Research

Posted by MFour on Jun 28, 2018 6:00:00 AM

Census Diversity Blog 25Jun18

Are you one of the many marketing and consumer insights professionals who have doubts whether they're getting good, representative data needed to understand Hispanics, African Americans, Millennials and Gen Z? Here's something new from the U.S. Census Bureau that shows how urgent it is that you stop subscribing to the common belief that certain groups are just "hard to reach."

“Population Continues To Become More Diverse,” is one of the section headlines in a new Census Bureau report that updates the U.S. population count and its demographic makeup.

The report spells more trouble for brands that can't get on top of understanding Hispanics, African Americans, and the Millennial and Gen Z generations that are the most diverse in U.S. history.

The reason they seem "hard to reach" is straightforward: Hispanics, African Americans, Millennials and Gen Z all have a strong preference for their smartphones over desktops and laptops when it comes to accessing, creating and sharing information. Research that doesn't get the mobile dimension right will inevitably suffer a data disconnect that you simply can no longer afford.  

These key figures from the new Census Bureau estimates tell the story:

  • The  U.S. Hispanic population grew 2.1% between 2016 and 2017, to 58.9 million. Hispanics now make up 18% of America’s nearly 326 million inhabitants.
  • African Americans’ numbers, grew 1.2%, to 47.4 million. They now account for 14.6% of the U.S. population.
  • People of Asian descent now make up nearly 7% of the population, after a 3.1% increase. 
  • While whites remain the biggest population group,  at 197.8 million, their numbers actually declined .02% from the previous year.
  • Millennials (now ages 22 to 37) make up 22% of the population and are coming into their own as the key drivers of U.S. consumption. If market researchers can’t find a way to reach them, there will be gaping holes in their ability to  understand the consumer cohort that carries the most weight.
  • Gen Z – newborns to age 21 – make up nearly 28% of the population, and they’re even more smartphone-focused than Millennials.
The takeaway from these population trends is that marketers and consumer insights professionals need to get mobile data right, because the groups whose numbers and buying power are growing are precisely the people who are considered “hard to reach” with traditional online surveys. After a half-decade or more in which too many researchers moved slowly on mobile, there's no more denying that it's the data source that all businesses and categories must get right. There’s no getting around the need to get mobile right. If you agree that it's crucial to step up to the state of the art in mobile consumer research, start by clicking here.

Topics: sample quality, millennials, hispanic consumers, african americans, Gen Z, market research

82% of Pro Basketball Fans Are Heavy Playoff Viewers

Posted by MFour on May 15, 2018 3:11:02 PM

 Screen Shot 2018-05-16 at 9.15.14 AM

In a nationwide survey of 5,032 Millennial and Gen Z respondents who are interested in pro basketball, 82.1% said they are frequent watchers as this season’s league playoffs near their climax. That includes 65.6% who report watching “nearly every game,” and 16.5% who said they’ve watched every game.

Frequent viewership ran even higher in states that are home to the four teams still in contention: Texas (94.7%), California (90.6%), Ohio (90%) and Massachusetts (88.5%).

But viewership also was intense among respondents living in some states that don’t have a pro basketball team, let alone one that’s still in the playoffs. That includes 93.7% of respondents in Virginia who said they have watched every game or nearly every game; 89.3% in Washington state, 84.7% in Kentucky, and 83% in Missouri. Survey respondents were ages 13 to 40.

As the conference finals continue with Golden State against Houston and Cleveland against Boston, rooting interest is fairly evenly distributed: 27.5% of respondents want Golden State to repeat as champion, 25.7% are for Cleveland, 20% for Boston and 15.5% for Houston. An additional 11.3% said they are watching but not rooting, since the team they wanted to win the championship has been eliminated.

Golden State owed its favorite-team status to female respondents, 38.8% of whom said they were rooting for the champs to repeat. Men, who made up 87.6% of all respondents, actually gave a rooting edge to Cleveland over Golden State, by 26.2% to 25.9%. 

Fans in Massachusetts appear to be the most deeply-invested in their home-state team, with 84.8% saying they are rooting for Boston. Among Ohioans surveyed, 78.3% are pulling for Cleveland.  Meanwhile, Golden State commands loyalty from just 53.1% of the Californians surveyed, and Houston has the rooting allegiance of just 44.8% of the respondents from Texas.

One big difference is that Boston and Cleveland each has its home state to itself, while Golden State and Houston both share their states with other teams – three others in California, and two others in Texas.

But even Massachusetts and Ohio residents who aren’t rooting for their home-state teams are rooting for somebody: not a single respondent from either state said he or she had no rooting interest at all. In California, 8.6% of fans said they’re continuing to watch the games even though they have no rooting interest, and 9.2% of respondents from Texas are watching but not rooting.

As for their views on individual stars, 40.7% of all respondents predicted that James Harden of Houston will win the league’s Most Valuable Player award, followed by 39.9% predicting LeBron James of Cleveland and 8.5% predicting that Kevin Durant of Golden State will take the honor.

The basketball fans surveyed also are heavily oriented to other professional sports: 87.5% said they are interested in pro football, 62.6% have an interest in baseball and 38.6% are fans of ice hockey, where the playoffs also are approaching a climax and competing for viewers. Professional soccer commanded interest from 30% of the basketball fans surveyed, and stock car racing had a 21.6% share.

Most of the fans who are watching the basketball playoffs said their interest doesn’t extend to the celebrity news surrounding one of the players, Cleveland center Tristan Thompson, whose relationship with reality TV star Khloe Kardashian reportedly is in jeopardy. Only 39.5% expressed an opinion as to whether the couple would stay together; 60.5% chose the answer, “I really don’t care, I have better things to do with my life.”

Methodology: The study was conducted May 10-14, fielded to validated, first-party U.S. consumers ages 13 to 40, who participate in research using MFour's mobile survey app, Surveys On The Go®. The 15-question survey was begun by 17,972 consumers nationwide, of whom 5,076 met qualifying criteria; 99.1% of qualifiers completed the survey. Mean completion time was 2 minutes, 59 seconds. 

 

 

Topics: market research, professional sports, professional basketball, consumer survey, consumer insights, millennials, Gen Z

3 Friday Insights Into Mobile Research

Posted by admin on Oct 7, 2016 11:02:43 AM

Here's your Friday roundup of 3 items from our blog to keep you up to speed on mobile research as you head into the weekend.

 

Whatever else you do, don't forget to check at the bottom for something to mobilize your spirits and get you humming.

 

Talking Technology With 1,000 Millennials

 

Trump v Clinton Mudsling Splatters MR

 

Follow Facebook's Lead...Into Mobile

 

And here's a Friday tune to send you smiling into your weekend.

Topics: clinton, Facebook, MFour Blog, MFour Mobile Research, millennials, mobile, technology, trump

1,000-Millennial Study: Views on Technology

Posted by admin on Oct 3, 2016 9:48:46 AM

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To wind up the first phase of MFour’s Millennial Insights Project, here's Part 3, on Millennials' views on Technology & Lifestyle -- with a focus on the smartphones and other computing devices that are the dominant technology in their lives.

Our study aims to generate insights into this crucial, much-analyzed consumer cohort of more than 75 million Americans, while demonstrating to the market research industry that the fastest, most reliable and effective way to reach Millennials is on the devices that define them -- the smartphones from which, as the results below show, they are in many cases literally inseparable. 

The data for this report -- and for the  previous segments on Millennials & Entertainment and Millennials & Money and Finance -- was obtained through the first wide-ranging, demographically representative study of Millennials undertaken solely by smartphone app. The fundamental premise is that Millennials are best engaged -- and will have the most comfortable and productive survey-taking experience -- on the mobile devices  that fully engage them in all phases of their lives.

Using MFourDIY™,  the first all-mobile, do-it-yourself survey platform, we obtained 1,000 validated responses within two hours from Millennials on the million-member active panel that uses the Surveys on the Go® smartphone app. The 30-question survey covered Entertainment, Money & Finance and Technology & Lifestyles, giving a representative picture of the U.S. Millennial population by sex, age, race/ethnicity, income and employment status.

These are key insights on how Millennials use smartphones and other computing devices.

Mobile is Multiple: Smartphone owners haven’t abandoned other computing devices – as long as those other devices meet the portability test. 87.1% also own a laptop, and 71.4% have a tablet.

But Smartphones are Essential: 92.3% of Millennials said they use their phones at least several times a day, compared to 32.1% for laptops. 44.9% said they spend at least five hours a day on their smartphones – compared to 23.3% who spend five or more hours on a personal computer (desktop or laptop). 79.3% of Millennials use their phones at least two hours a day, compared to 45.7% for personal computers.

Only 3.8% of respondents said they use their smartphones less than an hour a day. Millennials are far more likely to make sparing use of laptops and/or desktops - 26.3% report using them less than an hour a day.

A Constant Companion: 45.3% of Millennials say they keep their smartphones with them 24-7. 93.2% say they keep their phones on their persons or nearby at least 10 hours a day.

Minorities are Really Into Their Phones: Majorities of African Americans (57.1%) and Hispanics (51.6%) reported spending five hours or more per day on their phones; Asians (42%) also exceeded Caucasians (38.9%) when it came to epic phone usage.

Desktops are Bottoming Out: Millennials are pushing the granddaddy of personal computers into retirement. Only 45.2% of them own a desktop; men are the diehards, with 50.6% still holding on to desktops, compared to just 39.8% of women. Affluence is another predictor for ownership of what most Millennials apparently perceive as a luxury they can live without. 54.2% of respondents living in households with annual incomes of at least $75,000 said they had a desktop as well as a smartphone. Desktop ownership in Millennial households with earnings under $50,000 was 42%.

Only one-third of Millennials (33.1%) say they use a desktop computer at least once a day. Almost as many (30%) are now using wearable devices such as smart watches at least once a day.

Whole Lotta Checkin’ Goin’ On: 88.7% of Millennials check text messages the moment they get them. They’re considerably less compulsive about social media and app notifications (41.2% and 40.5%, respectively, get checked immediately). Email continues to trend downward -- just 35.3% get opened right away. 51% check their apps' push notifications at least once an hour, compared to 48.6% for email. 

OK With Their OS: Overall, Millennials seem satisfied with whatever smartphone operating system they’re using now. Those saying they were likely or very likely to switch (25.6%) were outnumbered two-to-one by those who said they were unlikely or very unlikely to make a change (51.9%). That left 22.5% who could go either way.

However, there were  differences  in the degree of loyalty commanded by Apple's iOS system and Google's Android. They were comparable when it came to their shares of loyal users -- -- 53.8% of iOS users and 50.4% of Android users said they were likely or very likely not to switch devices. But on the other end, Android users were twice as likely to express  discontent: 32.9% said they were likely or very likely to switch to a different OS, compared to 16.7% for iOS.

Can Google poach some of the 29.5% of iOS users who said they were neutral about keeping their current system, while persuading the 16.7% of neutral Android users to stay? Can Apple succeed in prying loose the one-third of Android-using Millennials who apparently are unimpressed with Google's system? Or, with nearly half of Millennials either poised to change operating systems or sitting on the fence, is there an opening for other system designers to compete?

Meet Your Next App: When it comes to discovering new apps to download, Millennials rank advice from family and friends (61%), social media (60.4%) and Apple and Google’s app stores (56.7%) as by far the biggest influences. The advertising about apps that's most likely to influence them is the kind they they receive through an app -- 33..6% of Millennials cited in-app advertising as a factor, compared to 23.4% who said ads on television, radio or in print media helped them discover new apps. News coverage ranked last as a portal to discovering, cited as an influence by 15.1%.

When it came to using  social media to discover apps to download, women were notably more active than men -- 67.6% to 53.2%. The same goes for legacy advertising (television, radio and print), cited by 27.4% of women and 19.4% of men. African Americans also stood out in citing legacy advertising channels as a source of information about apps – 37.1% compared to 22.6% of Hispanics and 20.5% of Caucasians. 

Just A Few Go A Long Way: About half of Millennials (50.7%) use 4 to 6 different mobile apps per day. At the extremes, just 15.4% use no more than 3 apps daily, and 13.5% use 10 or more. App usage varies little across ethnicities, age segments and gender.

Methodology

 

Using MFourDIY, the market research industry’s first all-mobile, do-it-yourself platform for designing and carrying out studies, MFour fielded a 30-question survey on Sept. 10 to Millennials who make up about 60% of its million-member active panel, all of whom participate in research via the Surveys on the Go® app for smartphones and tablets. Fielding time was less than two hours for 1,000 validated responses.

Responses reflected U.S. Millennials’ demographic profile: 50% male, 50% female; 56% Caucasian, 19% Hispanic/Latino, 14% African American/Black, 5% Asian, 1% each for Middle Eastern, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans/Alaskans; 3% Other. Age brackets were 18-24 (36%), 25-29 (31%) and 30-36 (33%). The study also segmented respondents by whether they were parents of children under 18, their type of work (full-time blue collar and white collar, part-time, unemployed), and their income (six brackets from $25,000 or less to $100,000 or more).

To read our previous reports, for Part 1, Entertainment, click here.

For Part 2, Money & Finance, click here

To view  all survey data, visit  surveysonthego.net/tracker and use these login credentials:

Username: MillennialCaseStudy

Password: MFourMillennials

Topics: MFour Blog, MFour Mobile Research, millennials, News, smartphones, technology

3 Weekly Insights on Mobile

Posted by admin on Sep 30, 2016 12:59:37 PM
Here's your Friday roundup of 3 items from the MFour blog to keep you up to speed on mobile research as you head into the weekend.
Whatever else you do, don't forget to check at the bottom for something to mobilize your spirits and get you humming.
And here's a  Friday tune to send you bopping and smiling into your weekend.

Topics: blackberry, international business times, MFour Blog, MFour Mobile Research, millennials

3 Weekly Insights on Mobile

Posted by admin on Sep 23, 2016 4:05:56 PM
Here's your Friday roundup of 3 items from our blog to keep you up to speed on mobile research as you head into the weekend. Whatever else you do, don't forget to check at the bottom for something to mobilize your spirits and get you humming.

Topics: entertainment, MFour Blog, MFour Mobile Research, millennials

1,000-Millennial Study Explores Entertainment Consumption 

Posted by admin on Sep 19, 2016 7:58:21 PM

 

entertainment

 

This is the first report in MFour’s Millennial Insights Project, an in-depth look at the preferences and behaviors of 1,000 American consumers, ages 18 to 36. Today’s report highlights results and findings on Entertainment.

 

We’ll follow with reports on Money & Investing (Sept. 27) and Technology & Lifestyles (Oct. 4).

 

We recruited and surveyed respondents through Surveys on the Go®, MFour’s all-mobile, app-based research technology and methodology, which reaches more than one million active panelists. The study collected 1,000 demographically representative, validated responses within two hours of launch on Sept. 10, 2016. Length of interview was approximately 15 minutes. Respondents were segmented by sex, race and ethnicity, type of work, income and age. We divided our Millennial subjects into three six- or seven-year age brackets.

 

Here are five insights we found interesting:

 

Streaming is King: Streamed programming is the most frequent viewing choice for 58% of Millennials – more than double the 28% who most often watch cable or satellite TV. There’s a substantial drop-off for cable/satellite viewing among Millennials who haven’t yet turned 30. Only 18.5% of this younger group say cable/satellite TV is their first choice, compared to 37% of Millennials ages 30 to 36. 78% of all Millennials consider a paid streaming platform their first or second choice when watching television, with 76% saying they are streaming more from paid services than they did a year ago. But most Millennials haven’t cut the cord on cable entirely: 64% of those who no longer live with a parent still subscribe to cable or satellite TV.

 

Binge Watching is Huge: By nearly four to one (78% to 22%), Millennials prefer a television series to be released all at once, rather than having to wait for a weekly episode over the course of a season. And 68% said they had binged on TV during the past month; 53% during the previous week. Across every grouping – sex, age bracket, race-ethnicity, and income level – U.S. Millennials are united in their eagerness to binge on TV shows.

 

Music Downloads are Going Mobile: More than half of Millennials (56%) said they had downloaded music to a mobile device within the past month, surpassing the 43% who’d downloaded tunes to a desktop or laptop. African Americans were especially active downloaders, with 69% saying they’d downloaded music straight to their mobile in the past month, and 53% downloading to a PC. Downloads for Caucasians were 55% mobile and 38% PC; Hispanics/Latinos went 57% for mobile and 46% for PCs.

 

Opting Out of Going Out: Fewer than half of Millennials (43%) said they had been to a movie theater in the past month, and 17.5% had been to a live concert. 40.8% hadn’t been to a live concert in the last 6 months, and an additional 15% had never experienced a concert.

 

Viewing on Smartphones is 2nd Only to TV: 91% of Millennials said they access entertainment on a television screen, with mobile phones second at 73%. Desktops and laptops were third at 63%, and 47% watch or listen on tablets. The youngest Millennials, ages 18 to 24, show  a preference for watching on smartphones – 74%, vs.  69% for respondents 25 and older. There’s also an intra-generational difference for TV screens, used by 89% of the youngest group and 93% of 25 and overs.

 

For a look at our entire Millennials survey, visit: https://www.surveysonthego.net/tracker

 

Username: MillennialCaseStudy

Password: MFourMillennials

 

MethodologyUsing MFourDIY, the market research industry’s first all-mobile, do-it-yourself platform for designing and carrying out studies, MFour fielded a 30-question survey on Sept. 10 to Millennials who make up about 60% of its million-member active panel, all of whom participate in research via the Surveys on the Go® app for smartphones and tablets. Fielding time was less than two hours for 1,000 validated responses.

 

Responses reflected U.S. Millennials’ demographic profile: 50% male, 50% female; 56% Caucasian, 19% Hispanic/Latino, 14% African American/Black, 5% Asian, 1% each for Middle Eastern, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans/Alaskans; 3% Other. Age brackets were 18-24 (36%), 25-29 (31%) and 30-36 (33%). The study also segmented respondents by whether they were parents of children under 18, their type of work (full-time blue collar and white collar, part-time, unemployed), and their income (six brackets from $25,000 or less to $100,000 or more).

Topics: african americans, hard to reach, latinos, MFour Blog, MFour Mobile Research, millennial insights project, millennials, mobile insights, News

3 Mobile Musings From the MFour Blog

Posted by admin on Aug 26, 2016 9:34:18 AM
Here's your Friday roundup of 3 items from the MFour blog to keep you up to speed on mobile research. Whatever else you do, don't forget to check at the bottom for something to mobilize your spirits heading into the weekend. 
And here's a  Friday tune   to send you humming and smiling into the weekend. 

Topics: max, MFour Blog, MFour Mobile Research, millennials, mobile, panel

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