Mobile News Mix

How Coronavirus is Impacting Consumer Spending

Posted by Catherine Gutierrez on Feb 21, 2020 5:06:33 PM

Consumer spending impacted by Coronavirus

Coronavirus is a consumervirus.

It’s as deadly to the economy, as it is to people.

In less than two months, COVID-191 has ravaged the U.S. economy, savagly infecting consumer behavior as it spreads around the world. And, according to Oxford Economics, it’s estimated the virus will likely lead to $1 trillion in global losses2 before it’s stopped.

Here’s why that matters.

Consumer spending in the U.S. accounts for about 70%3 of the economy. That’s a massive amount of balance precariously placed on the health of consumer behavior. Any move in the wrong direction, and we find ourselves in a very painful predicament.

Our economy depends on China. A lot.

The U.S. supply chain is very closely tied to China. And the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai has found that 78% of American companies don’t have enough staff to resume full production4. Nearly half said the shutdowns are impacting their global supply chains.

On Feb. 1, Apple closed all of its retail stores, and offices in China 5.

The impact on consumerism is clear, especially in technology. China makes roughly half of the world’s LCD panels for TVs, laptops, and computer monitors. Its economic impact6 is expected The longer Coronavirus is in play, the greater the impact will be.to be worse than:

  • 2003 outbreak of SARS
  • 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster
  • 2011 Thailand floods

What we found in researching consumers

“We’re seeing the early impact on consumer behavior,” says Jeff Harrelson, COO at MFour. “Eighty-six percent of our consumer panel is limiting social interaction. Travel is social. So, we’d expect other high-traffic businesses to feel the effects3, as the outbreak continues.”

Research highlights from the Surveys On The Go® consumer panel:

  • 38% airport decline was observed through GPS tracking on panelists’ smartphones
  • 72% of panelists expected the concern of Coronavirus to last more than two months
  • 86% planned to limit social interactions, or visits to public places, as a preventive step

This means COVID-19 caused a 38% drop in U.S. consumer behavior.

In early January, the first death7 linked to COVID-19 was reported. Consumers took notice. Two weeks later, MFour traced its consumer panel’s visitation to the top 10 U.S. airports. Using the market research app, Surveys On The Go®, the company found a 38% decline in airport visits. The drop correlates to the first reported Coronavirus case in the U.S8.

The behavioral data tells us travel was much more impacted than what was stated in the surveys we ran. This is why watching what consumers do is more important than just surveying. As we tracked people, we saw up to a 38% dip in travel, compared to the 23% that was stated in surveys. That’s a 15% shift in behavior, observed by tracking their locations.

Research was conducted comparing visitation to top 10 US airports by MFour's consumer panel.  Examined Jan - Feb 2019 vs. same period 2020.  

For a full copy of the Research Reports click here to contact MFour.

References:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html
  2. https://www.oxfordeconomics.com/my-oxford/publications/537166
  3. https://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/19/consumer-spending-and-the-economy/
  4. https://www.amcham-shanghai.org/en/article/supply-chains-and-factory-openings-amcham-shanghai-mini-survey
  5. https://qz.com/1800540/how-coronavirus-is-upending-the-tech-industrys-supply-chain/
  6. https://www.wsj.com/articles/commentary-supply-chain-risks-from-the-coronavirus-demand-immediate-action-11582054704
  7. https://apnews.com/c0e87e089a89fa5579e1c63acded7d46
  8. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2020/p0121-novel-coronavirus-travel-case.html

Topics: consumer research, consumer survey, consumer insights, mobile market research panel, customer survey,

How cash motivates 50% response rates for surveys

Posted by Catherine Gutierrez on Jan 23, 2020 10:38:01 AM

2-1 Ratio-Unsplash-1

Have you seen the article?

Surveys On The Go® is the #2 side hustle app for consumers.

That's why we get 50% completes on your surveys. They're paid cash for their input. And they're only too happy to give you photos and videos of their feedback on your brand.

Got a brand question? Our consumer panel will answer it.

And it only gets better.

Surveys On The Go® is now the nation's largest consumer panel. With that big of a panel, and a 50% return on your completes, there isn't a survey or a data project, we can't help you with.

So, why not try it out?

In many cases, we turn around research in less than 24 hours.

That’s accurate, validated consumer data - in a day.

And because we use an app, the feedback is in real-time. Your consumers are responding to surveys while they’re still experiencing your brand. It doesn’t get any better than that: freshly sourced data - straight from their smartphone.

So, if you’re asking:

  • How can we better meet buyers’ needs?
  • What do buyers think of the brand/product?
  • What’s the market look like for the brand/product?

Get the answers.

We’ll deliver the data you need. Contact us.

Topics: consumer research, consumer survey, consumer insights, mobile data, mobile consumers, mobile market research panel

What does "active" panel mean?

Posted by Catherine Gutierrez on Dec 9, 2019 6:19:00 PM

person-looking-confused-162033-2868235

Hint: Size isn't everything. Panel performance is.

When it comes to market research, we look at panel size for feasibility.

Right?

Wrong. What we want are the right people to take our surveys. See, what matters most when we're trying to conduct research is reaching our target audience. We want to know the number of completes we're going to get. 

I'll show you what I mean. 

Say you engage with a vendor who has a panel of 10 million people. They’re going to have a great response rate. Right? Not so fast. This panel only gets a 1% response rate.

10,000,000 x 1% = 100,000.

Uh oh.

That’s pretty small.

And it means that size isn't everything. Activity is.

So what is an active panelist? The AAPOR defines an active panelist as having participated in at least one survey or updated his/her profile in the last year. As such, panel size depends greatly on the status of a member.

This means that when it comes to panel size, consumer engagement is what counts. That's why the days of online panel groups are numbered (read the eBook) and why mobile research is where the value is. The secret is to work with a panel who wants to give you feedback, not a consumer who thinks they're ignoring email spam.

See, consumers who want to take your survey, and are incentivized to do so – they engage and become active.

That engagement can mean 100,000 completes or more.

Surveys On The Go®,  the nation's largest, first-party consumer panel, pays people to take surveys. These are consumers you need. They're representative and engaged, because they are paid to be.  Surveys On The Go® is a market research app, so we see where consumers shop, what phones they own, and what they do on their phones.

Look at who's in the app:

Our Highly-Representative, Validated, All-Mobile Consumer Panel

And they're ready to give you data. To the tune of 50% completes in under 24 hours of sending a survey.

You’re a lot more likely to reach the completes you need with an engaged panel. So, the next time you’re getting ready to field a survey, think about who you want to reach. Do you want a representative sample?

Surveys On The Go® is the largest, first-party panel in the US. The surveys are sent directly to the app on their phones. And because consumers are paid cash to share their data, they are happy to do so. Clients get a representative sample. Consumers get cash.

Everyone wins.

To learn more about our consumer panel, or see where they're shopping right now, visit our path to purchase page: www.mfour.com/consumer-panel

Topics: consumer research, consumer survey, consumer insights, mobile market research panel, customer survey,

Improve customer surveys: 3 tips

Posted by Catherine Gutierrez on Sep 20, 2019 1:11:44 PM

Improve customer surveys with three pro tips

The average US adult spends 2 hours 55 minutes a day on their phone.

About 90% of that time is spent in apps. So, why is market research still done online? An online customer survey in today's smartphone world is a beach in the dead of winter: cold, quiet, and deserted.

Consumers have migrated.

They're not waiting for a survey to hit their inbox. Right now, they're on a smartphone in an app, and sharing feedback with companies who are willing to listen to what they have to say. Want to reach them? Follow these tips:

Tip #1: Be timely

People are busy. 

Customer surveys are often irrelevant - taking place long after an event occurs. Today's consumer expects instant results. Our surveys should be the same and sent out within 24 hours of a purchase. Let's take an example:

Shelly goes to Walmart.

She has a grocery list. It doesn't include diet coke. She walks out with a case anyway. If you're Coca-Cola, you'd probably like to know what prompted her to buy a diet coke. Should this survey be sent next week?

No.

By the time next week rolls around, Shelly can't remember when, and maybe even why, she bought the coke. By sending Shelly a customer survey within 24 hours of her purchase, she remembers her shopping trip, any ads she may have seen, and can now retrace her path to purchase.

Tip #2: Get personal

It's happened to all of us.

You're called by a wrong name, or see your name misspelled. It's impersonal, and it sucks. The same can be said for sending blanket customer surveys. The average survey response rate is 33%. That's a pretty low number, and it's likely because we're taking a shotgun approach: trying to talk to everyone the same way, at the same time. 

Market research must evolve. We have the technology now to marry surveys and data. You can see who passed your location, what they bought, and why they didn't choose a competitor. Use that technology to get personal with your consumers. Segment them and reach out accordingly, and you're likely to see a big difference.

Tip #3: Make it easy

Meet consumers where they are.

If adults spend 90% of their phone time on an app, consider connecting there. You may want to look into using a mobile consumer panel to field your customer surveys. These are consumers who have opted in to share their opinion and are being paid to do so. They want to give input, and will allow you to see their online shopping and buying journeys.

As behaviors change, market research needs to adapt.

To be accurate and trustworthy, customer surveys must be fast, flexible and multi-faceted. The goal is to make it simple for consumers to provide reliable input you can use today to adjust advertising spend and ROI. See how companies like Walmart, Warner Bros. Pictures, and PepsiCo are adjusting their approach to customer surveys.

Topics: consumer research, consumer survey, consumer insights, mobile market research panel, customer survey,

Winter Is Coming for Online Market Research, Frozen Out by 5G Mobile Connectivity

Posted by MFour on Dec 21, 2018 11:50:55 AM

If you’ve been late to the party in adopting advanced mobile market research, you have perhaps two more years to get on board with today’s unique mobile data solutions – or else. The longer you remain in a state of inertia by clinging to the online studies that have been a steady standby since at least the early 2000s, the less representative your data will be. Online representation of U.S. consumers is crumbling at an accelerated pace, and in two years it will be a memory.

Call it the threat and the opportunity of a rising G-force.

In physics,  G stands for “gravitational” and represents the amount of resistance encountered by objects in motion. “Because of the stresses and strains on objects, sufficiently large g-forces… can be highly destructive,” says gforces.net.

“Stress,” “strain” and “highly destructive” are unavoidable conditions for researchers and brands that ignore the inexorable effect of a different kind of G-force in which G is for “generation” – the term communications technologists have coined to describe advances in the speed and efficiency with which successive generations of smartphones process mobile data.

This “G” spells great opportunity for market research that’s committed to meeting today’s consumers in the mobile sphere where they live. But it’s  disastrous for those who remain slow to adapt to the new reality.  Online consumers continue to morph into mobile-only consumers, and for the vast majority of U.S. residents, smartphones already are the dominant means of receiving, sharing and creating information. Now online is about to suffer a death blow from the next G-force in communications: the advent of 5G mobile access to the internet.

  • The dawn of 5G smartphones is rapidly approaching. 5G adoption is expected to take off as soon as 2020, thanks to data speeds 10 to 100 times faster than the current mobile standard, 4G.
  • “5G networks are the next generation of mobile internet connectivity, offering faster speeds and more reliable connections on smartphones and other devices than ever before,” reports techrader.com, with United States mobile providers leading the way. “Many companies are busy making sure their networks and devices are '5G ready' in time for 2020, meaning some networks may launch before then.”

A recent rundown from Business Insider summarizes what the onslaught of 5G will mean for consumers as mobile data races ahead of online data.

  • “Mobile 5G networks will be able to transfer data at speeds that are 10-100 times faster than on 4G…making mobile internet activities…more seamless and enjoyable on smartphones….
  • “Mobile 5G will provide consumers with internet speeds even faster than their current home internet speeds.”
  • “For instance, AT&T's impending mobile 5G network will have peak download speeds of 400 Mbps,” quadrupling the average speed of current home broadband connections.

In fact, the destruction of online consumer research representation already has crossed beyond the point of reversal.

  • Pew Research Center, which tracks Americans’ internet access, reported earlier in 2018 that fully 20% of U.S. adults rely solely on mobile and have abandoned traditional online broadband access to the internet. That’s up 67% from just two years earlier.
  • The number of these “smartphone dependent” adults who lack home broadband rises to 29% for 18- to 29-year-olds, and 24% for those ages 30 to 49. If you’re not reaching these key, mobile-only consumers, your research representation already stands 20% or more below the threshold of reliability. There’s no trusting data that comes from such a narrow bandwidth of the public.

The takeaway isn’t hard to see: if you’re not already studying consumers with advanced in-app mobile location-tracking and surveys, you’re digging for data in all the wrong places. 

The good news is that it’s not hard to play a rapid game of catch-up. Scores of leading brands and market research firms partner with MFour for mobile-app research technology and the fully-representative first-party, all-mobile consumer panel MFour has cultivated around its groundbreaking Surveys On The Go® mobile research app. Among MFour’s offerings are mobile brand tracking studies whose data is of-the-moment, but can be integrated with historical online tracking data to avoid a sharp break with your existing data sets.  

Those who fail to integrate mobile successfully into their trackers will have a woeful time getting quality data. It’s just one of the ways in which winter is coming for online market research.

 

 

Topics: mobile research, market research, consumer insights, mobile solutions, 5G technology

Spending Big on Social Media Ads? Test Them First in Targeted Consumers' Actual Social Feeds

Posted by MFour on Dec 4, 2018 6:00:00 AM

Blog Social Ad Testing 21Nov18

The good news for advertising on social media is that a massive audience gathers there. The bad news is that any given social media ad is a small raft of messaging in a limitless ocean of content. To increase your social ads’ chances of being discovered - and lifting consumers’ brand and product awareness and intent to buy - keep reading.

But first, some recent data from Pew Research Center shows how potentially rewarding social media platforms can be for advertisers.

  • 73% of U.S. adults use YouTube.
  • Among teens, YouTube use rises to 85%.
  • 68% of U.S. adults use Facebook.
  • Facebook usage is highest among ages 18-29 (81%) and women (74%).
  • 50% of U.S. adults visit Facebook at least once a day.
  • Instagram’s share of the U.S. adult audience is 35% and Twitter’s is 24%.

That’s a lot of consumers who can potentially be reached by a given ad. The challenge is to turn the potential of social media advertising into a real return on investment. Measuring the effectiveness of social media advertising has been controversial, with concerns about transparency over impressions and other key metrics. But setting aside that debate, there can be no question that brands and agencies control the creative content of their social media ads, and need to know as much as possible as soon as possible about how the ads they’re creating are likely to be viewed and acted upon by their intended social audiences.

MFour offers an advertising research product called Social Ad Testing that raises the chances of success for any social ad campaign. It’s a test that doesn’t seem like a test to the recipients you’re targeting. Instead, Social Ad Testing presents the ad as natural content in target consumers’ actual social news feeds. The test ad is consistent with all the other posts and advertisements the recipients are scrolling through in their feeds. You’re testing in the wild, so to speak - in the natural environment where your ad must flourish or fail once the campaign actually begins.

Social Ad Testing is the only method that takes your ad right into the wilds of social media. All the others do the testing in a simulated social environment. First, you’ll just observe how your test audience responds to the ad. How long was it in view? Did they click on it to activate audio? Did they share it or “like” it?

Next, you’ll step out from behind the curtain and show them the ad, so you can survey them using key qualitative questions about which creative elements work, which don’t, and how favorable they are toward the product and brand. If all signals read “go,” you launch the campaign with confidence. If the ad isn’t ready for prime time, the test will tell you not only that it needs work, but point you to the creative elements you need to improve. With that guidance, you’ll revise and retest until you know the ad is ready to give you your best shot at capturing attention and motivating consumers in the social space.

You can test an ad across different social platforms to see where you should direct your budget. Or you can test different versions, compare, and decide which is the one to use. 

The social ad space is too big and untamed to venture forth unprepared. With Social Ad Testing, you give your campaigns the best chance of breaking through.

Topics: mobile research, mobile market research, consumer insights, Social Ad Testing, advertising research, social media

Cold, Hard Survey Data Isn’t Cold or Hard when it Reveals Consumers’ Emotions

Posted by MFour on Nov 15, 2018 7:00:00 AM

Blog Empathy 1Oct18

Empathy is indispensable to strong friendships, marriages, and any other rewarding human interaction. For brands, forging empathetic bonds is the essence of winning customer loyalty. Consumer insights pros have a pivotal role to play in empathy building, since they are the observing eyes and attentive ears who collect the data that leads to understanding, without which there can be no emotion-based connection.

A recent article posted online by the Harvard Business Review explores new ways of training employees to understand and empathize with the customers they serve. It lays out a four-step process that, significantly, begins with “Gathering insights. What is broken, frustrating, surprising or uncomfortable for your customer?”

The article, “To Get Employees To Empathize with Customers, Get them To Think Like Customers,” proposes a bit of unusual game-playing to put employees in customers’ shoes. Authors Erin Henkel and Adam Grant suggest that managers identify a business in an unrelated industry that interacts with customers in ways comparable to the one trying to up its customer-empathy game. Then it sends employees to have a customer experience with the mirror brand, and see how it feels to need service and see where it succeeds or falls short. The idea is that there will be more freedom for discussion if their own company’s policies and execution are not the direct subject of a customer-empathy discussion.

“It takes time and energy to design these experiences,” the authors write, “….but we’ve found them to be a powerful way to ensure that the people in your organization truly understand their customers.”

The challenge for any brand as it tries to understand “what is broken, frustrating, surprising or uncomfortable for your customer” is to strike while the emotions and experiences are hot.

Too often, the data harvested via consumer surveys reflects stale memories, and little, if any emotion, because emotion often flares during and directly after an experience, but quickly subsides.

In an act of empathy for marketers and market researchers, we’ll lay out the bones of our solution, which we call survey research at the Point-of-Emotion®.

First comes the not-so-secret ingredient: a first-party consumer panel of representative U.S. consumers.

Next comes the unique, proprietary ingredient: Surveys On The Go® (SOTG), the research industry’s most advanced and reliable mobile app for locating and surveying consumers during their buying journeys. We’ve empathized with our app-users by giving them great mobile experiences that satisfy their demand for smooth-functioning, fun experiences on their smartphones

Since its debut in 2011, SOTG has received consistent ratings of 4.5-stars out of 5 at the Apple and Google Play stores. Our users’ satisfaction gets you the engagement you need for fast, accurate data.

The right people, engaged by the right technology, gets you the right-now, right-place data you need to uncork emotions and experiences before they’ve gone flat due to the passage of time. You can field surveys while your audience is still in a store, or wait until they exit for a post-visit survey that captures their entire experience.

For an empathetic discussion of how mobile-app location studies can meet your projects’ specific needs, just get in touch by clicking here.

 

Topics: point of emotion, geolocation, market research, consumer insights, in-app Mobile surveys, consumer experience

In-App Mobile Market Research Reached 2,500 Millennials for in-Depth Consumer Insights

Posted by MFour on Nov 14, 2018 11:00:00 AM

Blog Millennial Women 13Nov18

Accurate consumer insights on Millennials will continue to be essential for decades. MFour Client ROTH Capital Partners (ROTH) has taken the challenge seriously, undertaking an in-depth study of 2,500 Millennial men and women in partnership with MFour.

You can check out ROTH’s announcement of its 2018-2019 Millennial Study by clicking here.

The survey encompassed 181 questions and had an average Length of Interview of more than 28 minutes, confirming respondents’ willingness to engage with longer, in-depth surveys if they’re conducted in the mobile-app environment that has become the most natural habitat for today’s consumers.

Among the study’s findings:

  • Two thirds of Millennials prefer to research significant purchases online, but 57% still prefer to carry out transactions in-store.
  • Virtual Reality shopping has become a fact, with 15% of Millennials saying they have used VR to evaluate furniture, while 16% have used “virtual mirrors” to see how they’ll actually look in cosmetics or clothes they’re considering.
  • Nike’s marketing gamble on Colin Kaepernick has paid off with Millennials – 34% said they’re more likely to purchase Nike products following the ad campaign featuring the controversial NFL quarterback, compared to 15% who said the ads made them less likely to purchase Nike goods.

Mobile studies such as the one by ROTH dispel two main myths of market research:

  • That Millennials are a generation that’s especially “hard to reach." 
  • And that mobile surveys are only effective for quick-hit surveys with short, simple questionnaires.

Increasingly, consumer insights professionals are realizing that Millennials are well in reach and can be understood in-depth if you reach out to them in the mobile-app space where they’re most comfortable.

Topics: millennials, mobile market research, consumer insights, in-app Mobile surveys, in-depth surveys, mobile myths

Let Gaming Apps Unlock Fast, 100% Efficient Consumer Insights

Posted by MFour on Nov 13, 2018 6:00:00 AM

Blog gaming apps 12Nov18

Benjamin Franklin said that “games lubricate the body and the mind,” and you could probably generate a lively debate as to whether the founding father’s wisdom applies to video games.

There’s no debating the importance of video games to a huge audience of players. Which means that there’s no debating the need for market research professionals to turn their gaze and consumer insights expertise toward understanding gamers– not just as game-players, but as fully-contextualized consumers.

As we’ll point out, mobile game apps aren’t just a gateway to fun for their users and a river of potential profits for their creators, but also a pipeline for all kinds of consumer insights into how gamers fit into a larger universe of shopping and buying.

Newzoo, a marketing and analytics consultant that tracks the gaming and esports industries, estimates the North American video games market at more than $34 billion in 2018, up 14% from 2017. It recently reported that there are 2.3 billion gamers worldwide, who it estimates will spend $138 billion this year, including $70 billion spent by mobile gamers. It’s the first time mobile will have accounted for more than half of annual worldwide gaming revenues.

Market researchers who want to get to know those many mobile gamers are in luck. Thanks to mobile-app targeting, they can be reached with 100% accuracy. You can design a survey that blankets users of the top five gaming apps, or just a single app.  You can ask about their gaming preferences – or their snack and beverage preferences. Mobile app-targeting from MFour gives you a 100% Incidence Rate for connecting with consumers by the apps they use. We simply match the apps you want to target against the apps used by the validated, first-party mobile consumers who’ve downloaded our Surveys On The Go® research app. 

For example, back when the Pokémon Go craze broke out, mobile app targeting enabled us to be the first organization to conduct a systematic survey of Pokémon Go players. Within a single day, we got 1,000 completed responses from 100% validated players. It wasn’t just proof of Pokémon Go’s popularity, but of Surveys On The Go®'s effectiveness, thanks to its own popularity among 2.5 million U.S. consumers who have downloaded it and are beyond-willing to participate in your research.   

If you’re looking for insights into what players think of various video games, app-targeting obviously gives you a fast, direct connection. But it will be just as useful for understanding consumers ages 13 and over for whom playing video games is just part of who they are.  They’ll readily engage with you about products and services across any consumer sectors. Remember, your IR is 100% – a big first step toward getting insights on a fast-turn deadline.

Of course, the same kind of targeting can be done with consumers who use banking apps, news apps, or streaming apps for sports and entertainment. You can focus on their satisfaction with the apps themselves, or just use the connection to get feedback on the snacks these app-users buy, the other forms of entertainment they consume, which electronics stores they frequent, and any other subject that may or may not have to do with their gaming.

You can even ask them if they agree with Ben Franklin that games are good for the mind and body. 

As promised, here’s a look at our study of 1,000 Pokémon Go players, completed in a singled  day just after the game’s July, 2016 debut in the U.S. Just click here.

 

Topics: mobile research, mobile surveys, mobile app targeting, gamers, market research, consumer insights

MFour Hires Team Members in Product Development and Mobile Survey Project Execution

Posted by MFour on Nov 12, 2018 2:44:08 PM

New hires Newsletter 

(Left to right) Renee Curtis, Tatiana Santos and Monica Lee

MFour announces the hiring of three team members who will play major roles in developing new mobile market research products and executing clients’ survey-based projects.

Tatiana Santos joins the staff as a Senior Project Manager who will shepherd clients’ projects from conception through data reporting. She previously was a Senior Project Manager for Ipsos. She worked in banking and investment management before branching into market research. Tatiana earned a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from the University of California, Riverside, and a Master’s degree in Communication Management from the University of Southern California. Outside of work she enjoys yoga, reading, biking and listening to podcasts.

Monica Lee has been hired as Lead of the Fielding and Panel team, responsible for driving quality and consistency in core functions of the survey process. She arrives from comScore, where she was an Insights Analyst. Monica also previously has worked at Kantar Millward Brown, and she was one of the key research leads for the 2016 edition of the American Marketing Association’s annual Gold Report on the market research industry. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Marketing and a Master's in Marketing Research, both from Michigan State University.

Renee Curtis, Senior Product Manager, will help develop innovative new mobile research products and enhance existing ones. She arrives from Broadbean Technology, where she was a team leader and oversaw the launch of a successful job distribution and record keeping software product used by government contractors. She is working toward a Bachelor’s degree in Technological Entrepreneurship and Management at Orange Coast College. Outside of work, Renee likes hiking and is a fine-dining enthusiast; she’s also serious about improving her German and then visiting Berlin.

Welcome aboard, Tatiana, Monica and Renee!

Topics: mobile research, mobile market research, market research, consumer insights

Post a comment

Subscribe to Email Updates

Recent Posts

Posts by Topic

see all